Dr Henry Rondel Le Sueur 1872-1921
Born January 1st 1872 the son of Francis Charles Le Sueur and Esther Elizabeth Rondel of “Fairfield” Rue du Hurel, Trinity.

"Fairfield" Trinity

“Fairfield” Trinity

The following obituary was published in the journal “Nature”
“He attended a private school until 1887, and then for two years was in the laboratory of a Jersey analyst, Mr F.W. Toms. Thence in 1889 he proceeded to University College, London, taking the B.Sc. degree of the University of London (Honours in Chemistry) in 1893 and the D.Sc. degree in 1901.
Dr Le Sueur’s teaching experience was entirely connected to the institution, namely the Medical School of St Thomas Hospital, where he was appointed demonstrator in 1894 and lecturer in 1904, a post he was still holding at the time of his death on July 9th, he was also one of the Secretaries of the Chemical Society.
There was but one break in his connection with the hospital namely that the caused by the war. In July 1915, he was commissioned Major in the Royal Engineers, and ordered to Gallipoli, to advise on chemical warfare problems, and the complaint he contracted there was probably in no small degree responsible for his final illness. On his return to England he was one of those originally appointed to Gas Warfare Experimental Station at Porton, where he remained till the end of 1917, when he was ordered to the United States to assist in the preparation of the American Gas Warfare Experimental Station.
Dr Le Sueur’s original papers are to be found principally in the Journal of the Chemistry Society. He was a most capable experimenter, who found it necessary to satisfy himself on the minute detail. This probable accounts for the fact that the number of his communications (24) was not large, but they are characterised by a thoroughness, which can only be rightly appreciated by those who know his methods of work. It was however as a teacher that he particularly shone out as a bright star, His capacity for imparting knowledge to others was most pronounced and quiet exceptional, and among his students in his laboratory he was at his best.
Dr Le Sueur’s most marked characteristic as a man was his unfailing loyalty, whether to the science of his adoption, to his colleagues and students, or to his friends. Certainly the Island of Jersey never possessed a more loyal or truer son. His efforts to mask his natural shyness and reserve of manner did not always meet with the success which would allow strangers to recognise the true qualities of the man himself, but those who knew him intimately realise that by his untimely death the science of chemistry has lost a devoted servant, and they have lost a true and loving friend.”

Card sent from Cairo to Elizabeth his sister

Card sent from Cairo to Elizabeth his sister

Prior to the war Le Sueur assisted Dr A.W. Crossley C.M.G, C.B.E, F.R.S. 1869-1927 who was a lecturer in Chemistry at St Thomas’s Hospital, and during this time became a close colleague, and it was Crossley who was the creator of the research station at Porton when the war began. Crossley had an able and close assistant in Miss Nora Renouf 1881-1959, during the war she became a survey officer at the Fuel Research Board. Nora was the born in St Helier, the daughter of John Renouf and Delahay Woods, Le Sueur’s grandmother was a Renouf, but I am unaware of any family connection between the two.

Le Sueur was a founder member of the Jersey Society in London, and became its chairman shortly before his death. He is buried in the family grave at Trinity Church.

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