Le Port peat square

Le Port peat square

The most significant exposure of peat was at Le Port in the middle of St Ouen’s Bay which stayed in view until a few days ago (it may well uncover with the current weather), I had seen peat in the area before in the early 80’s a little more off the sea wall.

post 2 port

In this second picture of the area you can just see the hoof marks animals on the near and right corner, with a slightly sunken path starting to run diagonally down, but not continuing along the peat. It has been suggested that these are early cattle marks which they may well be, but I do wonder if they also may belong to horses that were engaged in vraicking and travelled along here before the sea wall was built and the shoreline would have been a dune system with paths giving access to the beach.

Remains of tree stumps

Remains of tree stumps

At the northern end of the bay there was an area that I had not personally seen before which was south of exposures I have noted previously, there was a considerable amount of tree remains as can be seen in the picture above and the one below showing a good length of a beech tree a specices that sems to be fairly common here.

Remains of beech tree

Remains of beech tree

flint

This picture is of an area to the south of Les Laveurs slip which showed an area of base grit and a considerable amount of stone flint which is not a local stone.

A couple of days after seeing the area I was contacted by someone concerned that someone had been digging the peat up, on visiting the area it was evident that a digger had driven over and dug up a considerable amount of area adjacent to a groyne that had suffered some storm damage, I have been informed that the incident is being investigated, and BBC Jersey did publicise the damage, as I said to them its lasted for 7,000 years and the local government department (TTS) have destroyed it in a day.

Digger damage

Digger damage

The incoming tide washed the peat and several stumps away

The incoming tide washed the peat & several stumps away

I have browsed the internet for other similar interesting areas and related information and came across this blog Micoburin which discusses the area around the Tees and a possible Tsunami and states the following ” a marine transgression recorded in a single pollen profile at around 8,200 years ago (and see below). A silty-sandy limus (detrital muds) at greater depth nearby yielded a date of 8900-8100 cal BC (89.8% probability). Perhaps this transgression represents the climatic cooling period around 6200 BC (the “8ka event”) that saw the collapse of North American ice sheets, disturbance of the Gulf Stream and rapid sea level rise?”

At Borth, Cerdigion a wattle walkway dating back to the Bronze age has recently been revealed again, it was studied in 2012 and covered in this post by “Heritage of Wales News”

Further north of Borth is Tywyn Beach which has a large area of peat some of which has been cut out, and includes WW 2 tank tracks, pictures on the local photogahic site the area gives rise to the legend of the lost Kingdom of Wales “Cantre’r Gwaelod”

Previous posts on the subject:

https://jouault.wordpress.com/2014/01/30/hercules-reveals-ancient-peat-and-clay-on-the-beaches/

https://jouault.wordpress.com/2013/01/26/peat-bed-at-st-ouen-gorban-of-guernsey/

https://jouault.wordpress.com/2013/08/11/past-lands-and-legends/

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